Friday, August 06, 2010

THOSE WERE DIFFERENT TIMES

I've been driving a lot the past few days. Yesterday was five hours. Today I have another four. Tomorrow I got five or six more. Then I'll be cloistered away from all this Internet noise for a while.

Anyway, to keep me awake while driving I downloaded some podcasts including one called Dan Carlin's Hardcore History. I had to download it just for the title alone. But it turns out it's really good.

The two podcasts I listened to yesterday got me thinking about the Buddhist view of its own ancient writings. As I've said more times than I can count, Buddhists do not view their ancient philosophical writings the way most religions do. We don't even view our scriptures (for want of a better word) the way Americans view the Constitution.

I saw a thing about the Second Amendment lately where someone was trying to say we had to be true to what the Founding Fathers intended. Why? That's the religious view of scripture right there. The Founding Fathers were not infallible. Their intentions may have been completely wrong. Or, more pointedly, their intentions may have been right but right for their time, not ours.

Religions tend to view their scriptures as infallible and their writers as perfect. Buddhists do not take that view. The ancient Buddhist masters were often brilliant, perhaps in many cases more brilliant than anyone alive today. But they were also people of different times and different places. We must never forget that.

The Hardcore History episodes I listened to yesterday concerned what we would today call child abuse and substance abuse in earlier periods of history. Listening to these, I was reminded how different our world is today form the world of the past. It's not just that there was no Internet, TV or flush toilets in ancient India or Japan or wherever. We may be dealing with a profoundly different kind of human being today than existed in the past. Possibly.

A guy in the comments section of this blog recently said that said Zen is not Buddhism because Gotama Buddha did not allow his sangha to have sex and in Zen even monks and nuns can fuck. I pointed out that he was mistaken. In Gotama Buddha's time the monks and nuns were forbidden to have sex, but the sangha in general was allowed to screw all they wanted as long as their behavior didn't cause problems. Buddha gave a formula for how to judge if your sexual activity would create trouble for society.

In his typically homophobic, chauvinistic, male-centric way, he said:

He avoids unlawful sexual intercourse, abstains from it. He has no intercourse with girls who are still under the protection of father or mother, brother, sister, or relative; nor with married women, nor female convicts; nor lastly with betrothed girls.

You gals and gays out there will need to make your own revisions. But you get the point.

In any case, one of the reasons the Japanese Zen tradition allows sex for monks these days is that it recognizes that we live in very different times.

In the Hardcore History podcasts I listened to yesterday Dan Carlin pointed out that what we would today call child abuse and substance abuse was rampant in the past. It was considered normal. And society was profoundly affected by this. People were different because of it. They were raised in a very different way. They made key decisions under utterly different circumstances. It's hard to imagine the kinds of things that were considered perfectly normal even as recently as 100 years ago. Go listen to the podcasts yourself if you want details. They're two of the "Blitz" episodes. The downloads are free.

In many significant ways we are very different people from the people Buddha was talking to when the earliest Buddhist scriptures were recorded. Yet in other deeper ways we are very much the same. It's our duty as contemporary Buddhists to understand this and to find the differences and similarities.

* * *

OK. That was a quick, off the cuff post to last you for the next week at least, if not the next six weeks. I'll have about four days between Great Sky and Tassajara. There's no telling if I'll be able to post during those days or not. At least two days will be devoted entirely to travel. Maybe more. I need to work on my intenerary.

Anyway, see ya later!

152 comments:

Harry said...

...and that's me again. I'm baaaach!

Anonymous said...

Harry you basta! shit!

Harry said...

Nyuk, nyuk, nyuk...

Anonymous said...

I spent too much time thinking of a thinking of a topical and relevant post to make then you swoop in like some kind of Buddhist terminator and snatch away my sweet number one.

And then laugh in my face!

Anonymous said...

Harry, Are you aware that I am Corsican? Do you know what that means?

john e mumbles said...

All the mug shots of Lou Reed in that graphic take me back for sure. I went to a great show he did in Kansas City in 1973(?), I forget, it was after TRANSFORMER came out and before ROCK AND ROLL ANIMAL…My friend Marc Colcord’s brother was playing keyboards for him in those days… Anyway, now Lou’s a Buddhist (Tibetan) along with his wife Laurie Anderson. Small world. Have fun at Tassajara...

Harry said...

Brad: "Religions tend to view their scriptures as infallible and their writers as perfect. Buddhists do not take that view."

This may be true (actually it more often seems it is), but we should bear in mind that the value by which scripture or written records are judged in Buddhism is SOMETIMES not some abstract or remote ultimate value but is the ever present reality.

If looked at in this way (avoiding simple dismissive assumptions that may arise from imbalanced interpretations of phrases like 'Zen is a special tranmission outside of the scriptures') then there is a real means of literary criticism in Zen tradition.

Master Dogen was engaged in this process, in fact this is one of the charateristics of his unusually volumous written records, where he often criticises, contextualises and, well, corrects the written records that came down to him. He jams with them, he didn't see them as some set-in-stone orthodoxy to be revered and put atop some unreachable pedastal, although he very much revered real things which directly express the truth (inc. sutras, sayings of past masters, real objects, the natural world and actions etc) as the truth itself.

Buddhist literature should be considered primarily from the perspective of our own direct practice, but it seems, in zen circles at least, it's more often considered as a piss poor orthodoxy or in terms of shallow intellectual negation arising from imbalanced interpretations of popular axioms like 'Zen is a special tranmission outside of the scriptures' etc etc

Regards,

Harry.

Anonymous said...

Brad said "We may be dealing with a profoundly different kind of human being toady than existed in the past. Possibly."

I think Harry a type of toady that has always existed and probably always will.

- The Corsican

Blake said...

This is where I like the use of the term "koan" which means "public record." This is the same phrase used in the legal system for "case law." Just like case law, one can use it to guide decisions or one can change it according to new community standards. This is how I view Buddhist writings. Good guidance but adaptable for modern times.

Harry said...

Dear Corsican,

Being a human being toady toady is not today what it used to be being.

an ancient pond,
plop,
I frog off

Regards,

Harry.

Frank said...

"In his typically homophobic, chauvinistic, male-centric way, he (the Buddha) said:

He avoids unlawful sexual intercourse, abstains from it. He has no intercourse with girls who are still under the protection of father or mother, brother, sister, or relative; nor with married women, nor female convicts; nor lastly with betrothed girls.

You gals and gays out there will need to make your own revisions. But you get the point."

The Buddha wasn't so concerned with the politically correct flavor of the day when making his points.

Anonymous said...

Robert Aitken passed away Thursday, August 5, 2010, He was 93.

Anonymous said...

sex is for animals.
yes, we're animals.
and so much more...

Anonymous said...

no more, no less.. just so.

Anonymous said...

so so

Anonymous said...

You and me, baby, ain't nothing but mammals...

Question those scriptures, starve in a desert because your rigid rules were written in a temperate zone? Hmm! Sounds like some ill fated Englishmen... Beyond the scriptures is what is important, though not without danger.

perruche-verte@livejournal.com said...

"He has no intercourse with girls who are still under the protection of father or mother, brother, sister, or relative..."

OK, let's be egalitarian and substitute 'he/she' for 'he' and 'people' for 'girls'.

What Lord Buddha is saying here is, don't sleep with anyone who still lives with their parents. Timeless advice that is still appropriate today, IMO.

gniz said...

Hate to spam, but wanted to say that Chet has requested I post an email he sent me about all the treeleaf stuff.

Given that he never had any input when all the drama was going on, i think it only fair that people get to see what he thinks of everything that went down.

You can read Chet's email here:
rebloggingbradwarner.blogspot.com

Mysterion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
john e mumbles said...

Blog commentator Myster Ion said: "Are you an Angle?" "No."

Behold, the Littlest Angle: ^


(Captcha: angsl !)

Anonymous Bob said...

"What Lord Buddha is saying here is, don't sleep with anyone who still lives with their parents. Timeless advice that is still appropriate today, IMO."

God I hope that's not what he meant.. The Buddha didn't say anything about not sleeping with someone who still lived with their parents. A lot of people still live with their parents these days. What he actually said was:

1. Obey the laws
2. Stay away from underage sex partners
3. Stay away from married people when seeking sex unless of course they are married to you.
4. Stay away from convicts when seeking sex
5. Stay away from engaged people when seeking sex

That seems very manageable, except maybe the part about convicts.. Convicts are like crack, once you've had one you just keep reaching for that pipe.

CAPTCHA : dorpro : I kid you not

Anonymous Bob said...

I thought you were an artist John E.

Your angel looks more like a fruit-fly.

I know.. Everybody's a critic.. This posting will not disappear in 24 hours.

Captcha : coolpie : I kid you not

R [1] said...

- “As I've said more times than I can count, Buddhists do not view their ancient philosophical writings the way most religions do.”.

That is fundamentally untrue, even if practically right.

All religions should view their scriptures (and I find nothing wrong with that word) the way Brad seems to want Buddhists to.

[Beside the point:

Lawyers are stupid, in the way Brad is saying, 108 could confirm, I don’t mean that generally; what M would say about men of religion would often be true too, but this does not have to do with the essence of religion, but with its degenerated state. It is very silly of the legal system to carry such a harsh similar attitude, such rigid materialism which loses contact with reality to an extant which may be called by an understatement considerable; - the stupidity and devoted ignorance of the religious emotional establishment and individuals may be more excusable; - but anyway the relevance here may be doubtful.]


The vision of men like Buddha or Christ was far beyond what secular men today could hope for in their wildest dreams. Brad is well familiar with that fact but he does not seem to be overly enthusiastic to dare admitting it.


An example I often thought of in the past is of a child who receive books (or other writings) suitable for his age.

At the age of three he might receive certain ones.

At the age of five other ones.

The explanations are sometimes limited to the child’s understanding ability at the time he receives them.

Assuming at the age of 12 the child would still adhere to the literal expressions or explanatory images of a book he received 5 years earlier, or at the age of 14 to that he received 7 years earlier, his understanding may indeed come to be ridiculed, as ignorant men of dead and merely configurative thought, completely unaware of the spirit, like the aforementioned M would be able to notice.


Also at the same time some of the fields in which our contemporary society considers itself enlightened and progressive are not at all so. This is also a truth almost no master dares to admit, - and Brad is of course no exception.

So the adjustments we might think necessary are sometimes actually an indication or a sign of our own ignorant and confident stupidity, born of our modern lifeless mind. Intellectual, - and idealizing intellectuality in the worst case. In other cases adjustments may be necessary, but those who have not acquired understanding which is not intellectual will not be able to tell which is which.

Also of course instruction given at a certain time may need to be revised, as humanity develops and / or as conditions change. - But I have discussed this in the last two paragraphs.


- Buddhism as we know it may be said to be a religion of wisdom.

- Consequently some may have the ability to make the appropriate adjustments.

- Christianity may be said to appear to have love as its main characteristic, here on Earth, - or to a certain degree at least.

Other religions would have other characteristics.

- In Christianity there would be far fewer men who would be able to introduce the necessary [or favorable] changes, and as a result of that fact over the years it would also be far less willing to accept them if offered.


So I would say the principle is the same with all religions.

R [2] said...

Understanding of the spirit surpasses that of the flesh. - However nothing is sacred and all instructions have a practical goal. - People should both use reason and be aware of the limitations of their undeveloped minds.

- Though this could generally hardly be expected today. As you all know.

- People don’t really have their own views:

- If you teach them from birth that the moon is a round piece of cake or piece clay, - that the nation stands above all, or that vice versa human rights do, - that mosquitoes - or cows - are holy beings that men must devotedly worship, and that they are superior to man, or that they are equal to him, - that noticing certain existing faults with others is a [great] sin, - or whatever strange assertions they have become used to since before acquiring their confirmative habits of what they believe to be their independent way of thinking, - as long as it goes a long with the elementary logics of the capabilities of a 7-years-old-able-, and sometimes when it does not too, as long as it suits the dimness of their minds, and as long as these opinions are well absorbed in their surroundings, - they will accept it.


Mysterion speaks of fluidity of thought, but he does not know the meaning of the word! It may be him who will not consider his possible wrongness, but then that is beside the point.


At the very bottom: - spiritual / religious rules are based on a certain understanding. - One who possesses this understanding may change them. Such understanding is not acquired at secular academic institutions. - It is fundamentally a matter of an inner change usually acquired by practice.

- Filling in the content after the ability is attained could be said to be relatively very easy.


At the end:


I find all this writing very tiring.

I don’t know why Brad feels obliged to write as much as he does.

R to Blake [- @ 7:39 am] said...

Case law is completely different from koan.

Koan is a record of an event which actually happened by which one can unveil a certain truth.

Case law means that if a certain court has been stupid once - other courts, according to law, - will be obliged to his stupidity.

Sean said...

*cough* *cough* Not to play games with patriotism, I'd just like to quip that I believe it can be fairly dangerous to our freedoms, if anyone would suggest *seriously* as if the intentions (in regards to our national government) as if those intentions of the founders of the Constitution, as represented clearly in the constitution -- and of our national government as anchored in the constitution -- as if that could all be out-dated today

Our generation has already seen its own attempts at stretching the limits of executive power, and I feel that the effects of that have brought a really odd light to things, today.

Is it religion, then, if it's not founded in (so to speak) "mere abject belief", but rather in plain rational knowledge - in that which one would endeavor to say is founded as so?

john e mumbles said...

Anonymous Bob, I was pointing out that M said "Angle" instead of "Angel" and my littlest was an angle, too, not an angel. It was a bad pun, my apologies.

Apuleius Platonicus said...

The Bill of Rights IS sacred. It's true that it didn't go far enough, but we should never go backwards in terms of freedoms and rights.

Anyone who does not recognize the sacred nature of basic human rights, like those enshrined in the Bill of Rights, deserves to be enslaved. Literally.

But fortunately for you as long as we continue to hold the 13th, 14th, 15th amendments as sacrosanct you will not be enslaved. But really, seriously, don't fucking push it.

Anonymous Bob said...

John E, You make bad puns, I make bad jokes. No apology necessary bro.

CAPTCHA : vessne : I kid you not

The Rinz said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Seagal Rinpoche said...

In dwelling, live close to the ground. In thinking, keep to the simple. In conflict, be fair and generous. In governing, don't try to control. In work, do what you enjoy. In family life, be completely present.

PhilBob-SquareHead said...

"gain enlightenment" it technically incorrect for Zen

Mysterion's bit of education here probably could have saved us all a lot of time and money regarding our beginnings with zen buddhism. At least for me. ($ spent on stacks of silly zen books)

captcha: suffil
example: "Suffil-bob, what ya' been up to?"

Jundo said...

Fucking Seagal ain't fooling no one. He cuts and pastes that stuff. And he uses stand-ins for his fight scenes. I'm from the Bronx.

john e mumbles said...

PhilBob-SquareHead,

You are not Mysterion's student, and he is not your teacher. Just ask him. He pontificates here and there to prove points to himself, to gain a good and hearty "Harrummpf!" Then the lamp of his hard-gained, paid-for with blood, sweat, and tears scholarship quickly shines elsewhere.

Now, if you can produce a certificate of transmission or the like, he will sponsor your school lunches for the semester.

So don't attempt to kiss Mister Yon's ass, it will not get you a fucking A.

Captcha: I cranky & need a drink

Robert said...

Robert Aitken! He didn't make a sound, but he left a ripple.

Brad Warner said...

Harry,

I agree with you. I don't disregard the texts, the koans, Shobogenzo etc. They're very important. I wrote a book about Shobogenzo, you know.

But in the US these days I'm seeing the fundamentalist attitude to scriptures being taken with Buddhist literature a lot lately.

We've got bumper stickers over here that say "The Bible said it, I believe it, that settles it." I feel like Americans often project that same attitude onto Buddhist scriptures.

I'm sleepy from too much driving. Not making sense. Will stop now.

Brad

Rest In Peace Robert Aitken. You're in Buddha Heaven now!

Jinzang said...

Buddha said it. I believe it. That settles it.

Gerry Gomez said...

Remembering Aitken Roshi:

"The dewdrop world
is the dewdrop world,
and yet -- and yet."
-Issa

Mysterion said...

Anonymous R [1] said... in response to:
- “As I've said more times than I can count, Buddhists do not view their ancient philosophical writings the way most religions do.”.

"That is fundamentally untrue, even if practically right."

They are not, however, regarded as 'sacred', perfect and complete descriptions of the truth. To view any scripture in this way is a form of idolatry. All books, texts, and bibles, however inspired, are human creations and subject to error and imperfection. Buddhist scriptures are to be used as reflections and pointers. They are being used correctly when they stimulate mindfulness, virtue and insight - when they lead to open and receptive states of mind rather than to unskillful mind states, such as greed, hatred and delusion. source

When teaching, I often substitute "Once upon a time..." for "this I have heard..."

What ELSE are you delusional about?

I am still getting 3 or 4 calls a week to come back and teach. I refuse because there are younger people who need the job! Sad, but many teachers, owing to a fundie Xtian bullet between the eyes, refuse to teach Comparative Religions. I thought Falwell was dead... he's still on TV!

Cleo Odzer said...

And, for more advanced students, that realization is:

birth is suffering
life is suffering*
growing old is suffering
death is suffering


C'mon Mysti..."advanced students"??? That's just the first noble truth. Life is suffering. You forgot the others.

Tanha / selfish craving is the cause of suffering.

There is a way OUT of suffering.

The way out of suffering is by following the 8 fold path.

Just sitting around saying There's just This or samsara is nirvana is meaningless. There's gotta be a turning about at the seat of consciousness. That is realization.

twin twins said...

The Bible sed it.

I red it and wiped.

Mysterion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mysterion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mysterion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rage at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

R to AP [- @ 1:23 am] said...

Even life itself is not sacred.

Should have Abraham consulted Isaacs advice and received before following the word of God?

Should Gutei have received his disciple’s permission before cutting his finger?

Are genocides performed in the Bible under a heavenly instruction truly wrong?

Should the people of Israel (or any other) have obeyed the word of God throughout the time of the Bible? Why? Why should they fucking care?

Rights are ultimately nothing.

- I don’t know the Bill of right - or the American constitution in general. I might hope Israeli law would progress to adopt more of it, but that’s beside the point.


- “Anyone who does not recognize the sacred nature of basic human rights, like those enshrined in the Bill of Rights, deserves to be enslaved”.


- ???!!!


That is several times wrong: -


First there is no such thing as a “sacred nature”.

The notion of anything being sacred or holy is fundamentally [and utterly] false.

The notion of sanctity runs contrary to clarity of mind.

The notion of sanctity or holiness can only arise with some haziness of mind. (of which our hope is to rid ourselves)


Second it may be just that, or the dim primitive mind which allows such a notion, which has allowed human rights to be violated with a righteous notion.

Perhaps only.


Thirdly - does one who is wrong deserve a taste of his wrongness, or an explanation? I think this points to the emptiness of the concept you use - “deserves”. - There isn’t such a thing really. - Following your “logic” you yourself might have to be pushed into some can together with your sense of “deservance”, - so that you can get a fine taste of what it really is.


Literally - your comment is annoying.


I don’t know what the 13-15th amendments are, and I don’t intend to find out.


Human rights are about as far as the blind can see.


For secular society they may be extremely important. I admit that. My intention was not otherwise. I might hope one day there will no longer be such a thing as a “secular society”.


In the Buddha Dharma, or in the spirit, they cannot but be transcended.


[these “rights” - i.e.]


However, - even in secular society we should not blindly accept the value of things without seeing it clearly for ourselves.

It does not fucking matter what your founding fathers intention was. Mothers included. - They may have been wrong or undeveloped in a way.

They might very well correspond to Dogen’s expression “stupid secular people”.

That is in general the point Brad seems to have had in the first place. Don’t sanctify. Be awake and cautious. Blindness is always laying in wait. The stupid are everywhere. And they always follow the trend.


- “Don’t fucking push it” means “put limits on reality”, - or something like - [try and] “compromise the truth”.


All rights and duties are rooted in idealism.

An exception is never possible.


The discussion of human rights is not essential to the matter primarily discussed, but if you do discuss it, I dare say it is as I have described.

Lone Wolf said...

I feel if Christians would take this approach to The Bible, they would not get so caught in the unhealthy attitudes that many of them tend to cultivate.

Jinzang said...

The notion of sanctity runs contrary to clarity of mind.

In Tibetan Buddhism they talk about sacred outlook, seeing everyone as a buddha and the world as a pure land.

Jinzang said...

C'mon Mysti..."advanced students"??? That's just the first noble truth. Life is suffering.

The four noble truths ARE an advanced teaching. They're called noble truths because only an enlightened person really understands them.

Rehn said...

jinzang,

In what way are the four noble truths advanced. They are part of the first lessen that the Buddha gave after his Enlightenment. And they're the core of his early teachings. What part of these truths is difficult to understand? On the other hand, Incorporating them completely into one's life may be difficult.

Rehn

Cleo Odzer said...

Jinzy,jinzy, jinzy. There ya go again. I didn't say the 4 noble truths couldn't be viewed from a deeper or more advanced level. I said the view that 'Life is Suffering' is only the first noble truth and hardly a realization reserved for advanced students. Seeing the reality of suffering is the first step. One could say that only an enlightened person can truly understand any of the Buddha's teachings. Why single out the 4 noble truths?

Anonymous said...

Four Noble Truths are Right View. Essay by Bhikku Bodhi addresses what you are noticing rehn...

"Perplexity sometimes arises over an apparent inconsistency in the arrangement of the path factors and the threefold training. Wisdom — which includes right view and right intention — is the last stage in the threefold training, yet its factors are placed at the beginning of the path rather than at its end, as might be expected according to the canon of strict consistency. The sequence of the path factors, however, is not the result of a careless slip, but is determined by an important logistical consideration, namely, that right view and right intention of a preliminary type are called for at the outset as the spur for entering the threefold training. Right view provides the perspective for practice, right intention the sense of direction. But the two do not expire in this preparatory role. For when the mind has been refined by the training in moral discipline and concentration, it arrives at a superior right view and right intention, which now form the proper training in the higher wisdom.

Right view is the forerunner of the entire path, the guide for all the other factors. It enables us to understand our starting point, our destination, and the successive landmarks to pass as practice advances. To attempt to engage in the practice without a foundation of right view is to risk getting lost in the futility of undirected movement. Doing so might be compared to wanting to drive someplace without consulting a roadmap or listening to the suggestions of an experienced driver. One might get into the car and start to drive, but rather than approaching closer to one's destination, one is more likely to move farther away from it. To arrive at the desired place one has to have some idea of its general direction and of the roads leading to it. Analogous considerations apply to the practice of the path, which takes place in a framework of understanding established by right view."

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/bodhi/waytoend.html#ch2

Anonymous said...

Right view is the forerunner of the entire path, the guide for all the other factors. It enables us to understand our starting point, our destination, and the successive landmarks to pass as practice advances.

This shit sounds like Buddhism. What the devil does that have to do with Bradism or Dogenism? Just sit in the proper posture and balance your ANS then you can forget all of that Buddhistry.

Anonymous said...

Brad, what do you mean by Buddha Heaven?

Mysterion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Rehn said...

Anonymous said: "What the devil does that have to do with Bradism or Dogenism? Just sit in the proper posture and balance your ANS then you can forget all of that Buddhistry."


In his tract "Bukkyo," Dogen maintains that in addition to sitting and understanding the nature of the self, a follower of the way should also know the Buddha's teachings.

Rehn

Jinzang said...

In what way are the four noble truths advanced. They are part of the first lessen that the Buddha gave after his Enlightenment.

Buddha taught the four noble truths to his first five disciples, who became arhats after hearing them. Buddha chose these five because after the deaths of his teachers he felt they were the only ones who could understand what he had learned in his enlightenment. So the four noble truths contained the full message of the Buddha's enlightenment. Yes, they can be understood at some level by beginners. But it's taught in the abhidharma that one becomes enlightened by realizing the 16 aspects of the four noble truths.

Mysterion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Nate said...

Hm.. I thought that zen and the US constitution were 2 very compatible things. The founders seemed to understand the value of "doing nothing" and I think the government they framed is still highly relevant, truly the best possible whether today or 2000 years ago (Rome).

Anonymous said...

In his tract "Bukkyo," Dogen maintains that in addition to sitting and understanding the nature of the self, a follower of the way should also know the Buddha's teachings.

Really? Really? OMG!
It sounds like this Dogen dude might have been a Buddhist too.

Anonymous said...

Mysterion!

Do you know what 'parasamgate' means?

R the Ran K. [otherwise considerably unknown] said...

- “Buddha chose these five because after the deaths of his teachers he felt they were the only ones who could understand what he had learned in his enlightenment.”.


I's funny for me Jinzang thinks the Sutras can be reliable and necessarily accurate with regard to such details.

The sentence itself doesn't make that much sense to me.

I don’t know who are the “teachers” Jinzang is referring to, but 5 people realizing the truth after merely listening to the four NT (or any other such teaching) sounds more like a legend to me. - Even at the time of the Buddha.


- And one other thing - understanding such a “truth” means that you know its truth for yourself. It means that you can see its existence for yourself. Not merely that you understand what somebody seems to have wanted to say. If you truly understand you are no longer dependent on the explanation you received, or on your faith in whomever you might have received it from. It means you know the things for yourself, and even if the Buddha would say the opposite you would still know it’s true. - Otherwise take caution claiming understanding. There is still a somewhat of a way to go, in such a case, I would say. So it seems.

john e mumbles said...

Sounds like a pretty good description of delusional behavior to me. When someone is convinced they “know” the truth, regardless that others –even the Buddha, huh?- disagree, that signals a red flag. We just saw the movie SHUTTER ISLAND over the weekend, and this story illustrates exactly this point. But I have also worked with many, many persons with a mental disability that are convinced they have found the “truth.”

There is no “truth” -no subjective “truth” –that would imply a separate self that is potentially in possession of something not equal or privy to all and everyone. There is only the infinite recombination of elements that goes on endlessly.

Anonymous said...

1. fully knowing suffering
2. letting go of craving
3. experiencing cessation [of craving}
4. cultivating the eightfold path

"These 'Four Noble Truths' are, as Nanavira put it, 'the ultimate tasks for a man's performance.' Nanavira illustrated this with an episode from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. After Alice has fallen down a rabbit hole, she enters a room where she finds a bottle labeled 'Drink Me'. Instead of describing what the bottle contains, the label tells Alice what to do with the bottle. In the same way, the Four Truths are injunctions to do something rather than claims to be believed or disbelieved.

Gotama described how each truth presents its own challenge: suffering is to be FULLY KNOWN; craving is to be LET GO OF; cessation is to be EXPERIENCED; and the path is to be CULTIVATED. The Four Truths are suggestions to act in a certain ways under particular circumstances. Just as Alice saw the label 'Drink Me' on the bottle and so proceeded to drink its contents, when encountering pain, one can see it labeled 'Know Me' and then embrace that pain instead of shying away from it....

The Four Noble Truths are pragmatic rather than dogmatic. They suggest a course of action to be followed rather than a set of dogmas to be believed. The four truths are prescriptions for behavior rather than descriptions of reality. The Buddha compared himself to a doctor who offers a course of therapeutic treatment to heal one's ills. To embark on such therapy is not designed to bring one any closer to 'the Truth' but to enable one's life to flourish here and now, hopefully leaving a legacy that will continue to have beneficial repercussions after one's death. Whether one embarks on such a path is entirely one's own choice."

Stephen Batchelor, "Confession of a Buddhist Atheist."

Harry said...

Zuigan called out to himself every day: `Master.'

Then he answered himself: `Yes, sir.'

And after that he added: `Become sober.'

Again he answered: `Yes, sir.'

`And after that,' he continued, `do not be deceived by others.
'
`Yes, sir; yes, sir,' he answered.

Regards,

H.

gniz said...

"Stephen Batchelor, "Confession of a Buddhist Atheist."

Before realizing who had written that piece, i was going to say how concise and well thought out it was.

I guess I have good taste.

The point is a good one, though it seems lost on many practitioners. Any kind of spiritual undertaking worth its salt is to be KNOWN first-hand, to my very bones.

Intellectualizing or adhering to dogma because it sounds like it makes sense, or because my teacher really thinks Dogen is the shit, or whatever the reason...is just useless.

If I can know something for myself, if it works for me and I have seen it, then I can speak to it from a place of authority.

gniz said...

Some people that discuss these things remind me a bit of people that know guitar theory inside and out but can't play a lick of music. They just know how to talk a good game about chord progressions, fancy jazz scales, etc.

I'd rather be an idiot trying to lay down elementary blues chords with my stiff, clumsy fingers--but at least I'm playing--then one of these faux musicians (or in this case, faux buddhists)

Mysterion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

if it's a mistake, it's a mistake.



if it's two mistakes, it's jazz.

Anonymous said...

"A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery."

Anonymous said...

abracadabra

Anonymous said...

Surprises are the joy of living. Surprises directly touch the soul. Good surprises energize and bad surprises teach. (Alev Oguz)

Anonymous said...

hear hear!
chance will delight and disappoint with disregard.

Anonymous said...

I also learned the correct pronunciation from a Pro from Dover

Really? How much do the prostitutes in Dover charge for a good BJ?

Khandasix said...

According to the late roshi Robert Aitken, Brad Warner is a fake Zen teacher.

"If your teacher is not a fake, he or she will tell you to count your breaths. If he or she advises you to do something else at the outset of your practice, you have a fake teacher. Use this criterion and find somebody genuine." Robert Aitken

Anonymous said...

jeez...

and i was always told to count the bubbles in my farts...

PhilBob-SquareHead said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
anonymo said...

Twitter - @anthonywatts Sorry I missed your question. I think you can be Christian and practice Zen. No problem!

7:53 PM Jul 27th via web in reply to anthonywatts - BradWarner

Hi mysterion! What say you?

Mysterion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mysterion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

If you define "zen" as the practice of zazen, then anybody can practice this zen and be a good christian, muslim, nazi, communist or scientologist.

But some people insist that "zen" is much more than just sitting in zazen. If you really practice this "zen" you can't even be a good Zen Buddhist, much less any of those other delusions.

Mysterion said...

The question regarded Zen and not Buddhism - of which there must be 1,000 splinters.

Living Buddha dead - 30 years.

Living Buddha removes meat from Dalai Lama's diet. (fish is not meat?)

ya can't make this stuff up!

If you swim far enough upstream, where Buddhism is on the cusp with Brahmanism... and feng shui is no more to be found... who knows?

Read the sūtrapiṭaka (Pāli: suttapiṭaka) or collection of discourses.

They all start with that famous "Once upon a time..."

The rest is BULLSHIT

Mysterion said...

you know, Dogen and

"Fukan zazengi" [pun]

Zen is a uniquely Japanese pacifistic variation of Chuan which incorporates martial arts. Anything is possible.

Dogen Zenji devoted himself to zazen. It started a 'fad' in Japan that caught on in the West some years later.

amused?

R said...

I won't relate to mumbles @ 10:37 thoroughly, and I haven’t watched the movie. (- and you might guess I don't intend to) I will say that the first five lines ring stupidity. I suppose he would not say he relates “delusional behavior”, - whatever that means, - to the Buddha. The bottom and the top might often seem similar. Inability to tell them apart might be a sign of severe shallowness.

- It is very obvious to me that the word “truth” does not call for subjectivity. - Merely dry intellectual understanding will do here. - mumbles might want to negate conceptuality in itself, - which he didn’t, - but that would still be irrelevant.

- As for whether there is a “truth” or there is not a “truth”, - what I said holds here too: - Whichever (or neither, or both) is true – you might understand that, or you might not. Apply what I said in the paragraph to which you are relating to that too. Believing the Buddha is not understanding. (Jinzang, there is a line for you in what I said, - (@ 11:57 pm) see it?) “I was the walrus, but now I’m John” might be.

And you seem quite certain in what you say. You seem to at least believe you understand it.


(“There is only the infinite recombination of elements that goes on endlessly” seems one sided to me. - And disharmonious even in that.)




This also made me remember what “Mike cross”, who is certainly more serious than john e., - says: - I haven’t read much of him, very little actually, - but he says when one thinks he knows he is no longer a seeker. He speaks about Nishijima. He says he always wants to remain a seeker, never be on the side of those “who know”. (I might have got this a bit wrong here. I read this some time ago. I hope I didn’t.) - So I thought - how about Dogen and Gautama, - would he not see them as ones who “know”?

It seems to me this is a matter of balance and actual situation. One might need to seek or one might not that much need to seek.

We need not artificially impose an intellectual prearranged situation on ourselves.

It is true there never is a limit, but necessity may calm.

Some might be 95% knowers, some may be 95% seekers.

And a few might be 94%, though I don’t know anyone personally. (joke, mind you. 93% at the most. 94% is delusional. source)




So far.




If Jinzang doesn’t come up with his line, - I’ll let you know.




Hegards,

R.

The Eggman said...

Seems to me mumbles is only holding you accountable for what you said at 11:57 PM, Ran,and as usual you are taking the opportunity to attack him personally.

On the other hand, -also as usual- it looks like you took his bait. Koo koo Ka Choo.

A said...

Buddhas don't save Buddhas. If you use your mind to look for a Buddha, you won't see the Buddha. As long as you look for a Buddha somewhere else, you'll never see that your own mind is the Buddha. Don't use a Buddha to worship a Buddha. And don't use the mind to invoke a Buddha. Buddhas don't recite sutras. Buddhas don't keep precepts. And Buddhas don't break precepts. Buddhas don't keep or break anything. Buddhas don't do good or evil. To find a Buddha, you have to see your nature.

Hegards,

A

Mysterion said...

Remember Rev. Suzuki's little stick: "Nothing you say is the truth."

Here we don't even have a dialogue.

We have monologues by proxy.

***********************************

Suzuki Roshi came to my house in Redwood City for meetings for a few months. On one occasion, he left his small emblematic stick. I thought that he might want it before the Sunday meeting in San Francisco, so I stopped by the Temple (then on Bush Street) to leave it.

He was there and when I handed it to him, I asked what the Japanese characters on it meant. "Whatever you say is not the truth," he replied.

***********************************

Buddharocket said...

I'm quite fond of the second amendment. No government overlords please.

Anonymous Bob said...

Mysterion said: "He was there and when I handed it to him, I asked what the Japanese characters on it meant. "Whatever you say is not the truth," he replied."

Interesting.. I wonder if this paradoxical statement had anything to do with the stick or was it just his feelings about Mysterion?

john e mumbles said...

I've read that anecdote elsewhere, I don't think its Mysterion's actual experience(?) but whatever, I'm glad he reprinted it here, maybe it will inspire Ran to shut the fuck up... (about "truth.")

Anonymous said...

From Crooked Cucumber:

PART TWO:

MEMORIES OF SHUNRYU SUZUKI ROSHI

AMY SIMPSON

Suzuki Roshi came to my house in Redwood City for meetings for a few months. On one occasion, he left his small emblematic stick. I thought that he might want it before the Sunday meeting in San Francisco, so I stopped by the Temple (then on Bush Street) to leave it.

He was there and when I handed it to him, I asked what the Japanese characters on it meant. "Whatever you say is not the truth," he replied. Thinking that he had misunderstood me, I repeated the question, with the same result. I thought, silently, how true that is.

Anonymous said...

remember what the great Sage Yogi Berra said: 90% of the game is 50% mental.

and:

It’s deja-vu all over again.

You should always go to other people’s funerals. Otherwise they won’t come to yours.

I knew I was going to take the wrong train, so I left early.

Never answer an anonymous letter.

If you don’t set goals, you can’t regret not reaching them.

Nobody goes there anymore. The place is always too crowded.

If you come to a fork in the road, take it.

I knew exactly where it was, I just couldn’t find it.

You can observe a lot just by watching.

Why buy good luggage? You only use it when you travel.

Prediction is always difficult, especially where the future is concerned.

I didn’t even say half the things I said.

Mysterion said...

Blogger john e mumbles said...
"...maybe it will inspire Ran to shut the fuck up..."

Let us hope so.

however,

"He that lives upon Hope, dies farting."

Anonymousmaximus said...

Blogger john e mumbles said...
"...maybe it will inspire Ran to shut the fuck up..."

Mysterion seconded: "Let us hope so.

Funny, of all people to wish that someone would shut the fuck up. I'm no fan of Ran but Mysterion could talk the ears off a clothes mannequin.

Mysterion said...

And has

Jinzang said...

I don’t know who are the “teachers” Jinzang is referring to, but 5 people realizing the truth after merely listening to the four NT (or any other such teaching) sounds more like a legend to me.

Buddha learned meditation from two teachers, Arada Kalama and then Udraka Ramaputra. The five were his disciples (or compatriots) while practicing asceticism, so they were no strangers to meditation practice.

Although it's rare, there are stories throughout Buddhist history of students attaining enlightenment simply through hearing a teaching. Most famously in Zen, Hui Neng from hearing a verse from the Diamond Cutter Sutra

john e mumbles said...

GIMME SOME TRUTH -John Lennon

i'm sick and tired of hearing
things
from uptight-short sighted-
narrow minded hypocritics


all i want is the truth
just give me some truth


i've had enough of reading
things
by nuerotic-pyschotic-
pig headed politicians


all i want is the truth
just give me some truth


no short haired-yellow bellied
son of tricky dicky
is gonna mother hubbard
soft soap me
with just a pocketful of hope
money for dope
money for rope


i'm sick to death of seeing
things
from tight lipped-
condescending -mommies little
chauvinists


all i want is the truth
just give me some truth


i've had enough of watching
scenes
of schizophrenic - ego - centric
- paranoic - prima - donnas


all i want is the truth
just give me some truth

Jinzang said...

Jinzang, there is a line for you in what I said

You want a comment on what you said? What gets called kensho in Zen is sometimes called "gaining confidence in the view" in Tibetan Buddhism. Khenpo Karthar compared it to inferring the presence of the sun before dawn by the light on the eastern horizon. The light is similar to the sun (enlightenment,) yet not a direct sight of the sun.

I don't know what answer you're expecting on the John / walrus quote.

Anonymous said...

99

john e mumbles said...

C

Mysterion said...

C + 1

Why did the Chicken (with the Buddha nature) cross the road?

!











or:

It was the karma of the chicken to behave in this manner.

Anonymous said...

mysterion, that photo gave me a real lol, thanks! the chicken *is* crossing the road.

john e mumbles said...

Hey Jinzang, You mentioned Khenpo Karthar; I attended a Heart Sutra intensive several years ago with Lama Kathy Wesley, and soon after a teaching with Bardor Rinpoche, are you connected with Karma Kagyu?

Anonymous said...

i, i, i, i ...
Canta y no llores!

Anonymous said...

Hi!Awesome post.thanks for sharing.I'm so sorry to send so many links in your blog comment.our company supply laptop batteires with good quality and low price.
DellInspiron E1705 battery Dell Inspiron 6400 battery Dell Latitude D600 Battery Dell XPS M1530 battery
Dell XPS M1330 battery
Dell XPS M1330 battery
Dell Inspiron 6000 battery
Dell Inspiron 1525 battery
DELL Latitude D620 battery
DELL Latitude D820 Battery
Dell Latitude D410 battery
Dell Latitude X300 battery
Dell Inspiron E1505 battery
DELL Latitude D630 battery
DELL Latitude D610 battery

Line for Jinzang said...

The Sutras say it. I believe it. That settles it.

clarification said...

I said: - "(Jinzang, there is a line for you in what I said, - (@ 11:57 pm) see it?)".


So I wasn't expecting an answer on the quote, - but on what I said referring to yours (- @ 5:16 pm) earlier.

108 said...

I am not an anon.

109 said...

What are you than?

110 said...

Cellophane flowers of yellow and green.

111 said...

Thanks, but I think this is tiring. We’ve had enough of this, - haven't we?

112 said...

Cheers, mate. You asked.

113 said...

#1!!!!!!!!!!!

Yahoo!!!

I new I can make it. Once and for all.












[source] (- Spread the virus.)

anonymo said...

Spread the knews..

113 said...

I'm #1.

Fuck the news.

anonymo us [+ k] never said...

Don't spread the news, 113, don't spread the news.

He who lives upon hope, dies farting. He who exhausts his farting, dies in peace. He who is empty from the outset dies worthless. He who is dead can be deprived of the body only.

Seagal Rinpoche never said that, - did he?

Jinzang said...

Hey Jinzang, ... are you connected with Karma Kagyu?

Yeah, I took refuge with Khenpo Karthar way back in the long ago. I'm currently studying with Lama Phurbu Tashi in Annapolis. Here's his biography.

Anonymous said...

thank goodness for tulkus. glad you have a good connect jz.

obske said...

Christopher Hitchens sat down with The Atlantic's Jeffrey Goldberg for a frank and fascinating conversation on his cancer and his religious beliefs.

"How am I? I'm dying," Hitchens said at the top of the video. "Everybody is, but...the process has accelerated on me. So I'm looking for ways to try to die more like you.

Hitchens spoke in very stark terms about his mortality.

"I'm a realist, I'm objective," he said. "It's not a good cancer to get. The statistics are very depressing. Mine isn't just in my esophagus, either. It's gone to my lymph nodes. I would be a very lucky person to live another five years."

Goldberg and Hitchens then welcomed Hitchens' "dearest friend," author Martin Amis, as the conversation turned toward religion.

Hitchens, an outspoken atheist, said he will never become religious despite his looming mortality. If any such conversion is ever attributed to him, he said, it would be either a lie propagated by the religious community or an effect of the cancer and treatment that made him no longer himself.

Swami #1 said...

enlightened beings are obvious by their appearance and demeanor.

certification?

Ed said...

As a Zen Buddhist who "emerged" (YAAHHH! Run for your lives!) from a Christian tradition, I have to say I get a little sick of all Christians being sandblasted with the same, uh, sandblaster. There are many, many Christians who feel they don't have to check their brains at the door of the sanctuary on the way in, who treat the Bible as a record of man's search for God and not as His/Her Infallible Word or whatever. Their spiritual life is as full of questions and doubt as any Zen Buddhist, and they rejoice in it -- knowing their practice is richer for it.

So quit hatin' on the Christians. There are lots of progressive Christians who aren't even into snake handling and such.

For starters, I suggest checking out the prominent progressive Christian theologian Marcus Borg (not related to the cybernetic organisms in Star Trek, so far as I know):

http://www.marcusjborg.com/

Johnson said...

Is there anything more fun than reading Brad's blog while he's on retreat?
Well, there is maybe one
thing.

Mysterion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
john e mumbles said...

I dunno, Ed at 9:47, I am drawn to the rattlesnake handlin,' strick-nine drankin,' wife beatin' types of christians.

But then I am drawn to the extreme expressions of any "religion" -purely from an anthropological p.o.v.... prolly why I hang around this blog, huh?

john e mumbles said...

...make that extreme expressions of whatever it is that is called "human" including but not restricted to religions.

There's nothing more interesting IMO than aberrant behaviors...Pushed to the limit, broken open, full on bat-shit crazyness...or something like...

"Zazen" is not natural, people have to be told to sit down and shut up, it is an imposition upon their inclination/motivation to "do something productive" with their time, (ie; mindlessly entertain themselves).

If it was "natural," people would just do it, and it would not need to be called zazen.

Mysterion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Big Mo said...

It's only a newspaper article, but read the entire thing!

You know what the Dalai Lama said: "One should disregard one's own well-being and cherish other's"

source

elsewhere he said it is better that all Buddhists die than for a single Buddhist anywhere to kill another human being.

Anonymous said...

The strangest sutra of all (it's about the Buddha's junk):

http://sdhammika.blogspot.com/2010/08/strangest-sutra-of-them-all.html

Mysterion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
john e mumbles said...

One night in East Tennessee, a snake handling preacher came up to us and said, “You boys got any snakes in that car?”

“We told him we didn’t.

“What? You mean to tell me you don’t have any rattlesnakes in your car?”

“No Sir.”

His eyes widened. “What’s the matter with you boys?” he said “Are you crazy?”

–Dennis Covington SALVATION ON SAND MOUNTAIN

Mysterion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
john e mumbles said...

At times, her parents' congregation comprised five people in a motel room, and the Hudsons spent their days passing out pamphlets, but they never doubted they were on the right path...

"Sex, God, and Katy" article on pop-singer of "I Kissed A Girl (And I liked It) fame Katy Perry in Rolling Stone, August 19, 2010 p 45

Anonymous said...

who here practices awareness while they type each key?

Lone Wolf said...

Lama Kathy is a truly amazing teacher! I discover insight into my life and practice each time I speak with her. She has a gift of making the teachings practical and useful for everyday life.

the Lone Ranger said...

Christopher Hitchens at deaths door and bored to death it's: His Zen experience

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zeiS7hYbb8c&feature=related

Go to timeline and go to about 7:30

john e mumbles said...

Lone Wolf: Several years ago I told Lama Kathy how amazing I thought Jamgon Kongtrul's commentaries on the Lojong slogans (published as The Great Path of Awakening, trans by Ken McLeod) was and she said if she were stranded on an island, that would be the one book she would hope she had with her.

Finding some common ground, she turned me on to Jamgon Kongtrul's extraordinary guide to Tantric Buddhist meditation, Creation and Completion, trans by Sarah Harding with commentary by Khenchen Thrangu Rinpoche. She is very cool, I am glad you have found that out about her too.

PhilBob-SquareHead said...

"I can do all things through Christ" Philippians 4:13

Zen compliments the Christianity I was raised with.

Mysterion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jinzang said...

Several years ago I told Lama Kathy how amazing I thought Jamgon Kongtrul's commentaries on the Lojong slogans

Last summer Lama Phurbu Tashi taught us those. He started by telling us how at the end of his three year retreat Bokar Rinpoche asked him which practice in the retreat he found the most effective. He replied that it was lojang.

Lama Kathy is a lovely person and a good teacher. I'm not surprised that you and Lone Wolf like her.

Anonymous said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ssBLBBWi_Q&feature=related

Eat your heart out Brad.

Anonymous said...

64 is a bit young to pass through the veil.

Lone Wolf said...

Thragu Rinpoche's commentary on Kongtrul's Creation and Completion is really good. Actually, Lama Kathy posted the below quote on her website after I posted it during an online discussion.

“Faith in one’s guru does not mean blind faith, it does not mean believing “My guru is perfect” even though your guru is not perfect. It is not pretending that your guru’s defects are qualities. It is not rationalizing every foible of the guru into a superhuman virtue. After all, most gurus will have defects. You need to recognize them for what they are. You don’t have to pretend your guru’s defects are qualities, because the object of your devotion is not the foibles, quirks, or defects of your guru, but the Dharma that your guru is teaching you. You are not practicing the guru’s foibles. As long as the Dharma you receive is authentic and pure, then the guru is a fit object for your devotion. You need to recognize the defects of your guru as defects- you don’t need to pretend they are otherwise. The guru’s defects cannot hurt you, because it is not they that you create or cultivate. You follow the teaching of the guru, and “trust” meaning trust in the validity of the teachings themselves.”

I few weeks ago I recieved Mahamudra teachings from Garchen Rinpoche. Dzogchen and Mahamudra are extremely similar to Shikantaza. Just rest (sit) in present awarness without rejecting or getting caught in thoughts.

About Dzogchen, Patrual Rinpoche says "If you were to meditate, it would be conceptual, so be without anything on which to meditate. Rest in regular thought. If you meddle with it, then it is the deluded chain of ordinary thought, so don’t contrive in any way. When you wander from resting in that immediacy it is real delusion, so there must be no wandering. Just that is enough. A non- destractedness without focus on any
reference point...the perspective of the Great Completion is not to reject whatever arises, but also not to follow after it. Resting in that itself without meddling is
exactly it. That being so, there is no thing to reject, no remedy, no do’s and don’ts, no keeping and discarding, etc."

He also says "In general, what is called “ordinary mind” means not to meddle with whatever thought arises. If you are not distracted from this, it alone is sufficient. This will not work for those of lesser capability, so you should cultivate the sitting practice with effort. Though you look at whatever thought arises, without the ability to calm it down, there will be greater mental activity and the body posture will collapse."

Lone Wolf said...

I'm currently reading Shohaku Okumura's new book Realizing Genjokoan. It's really good. I see Brad has a blurb on it. It's nice to read Okumura's commentary with Nishijima's philosphical perspective -- three philosphies, one reality -- on Dogen's work.

I'm looking foward to reading Nishijima and Brad's commentary on Nargajuna's Mulamadhyamakakarika. I'd like to compare it to The Sun of Wisdom, Khenpo Tsultrim Gyamtso's commenary on the same text.

I also can't wait to read Brad's new book Sex, Sin, and Zen. A real exploreation of sex and Buddhsim is long overdue.

Lone Wolf said...

Btw, in case that first quote about "Faith in one guru is not blind faith...." came across like it was my own, it's from Thrangu Rinpoche's commentary on Kongtrul's Creation and Completion.

john e mumbles said...

Sun of Wisdom is an excellent book, I've read it a couple of times.

I like what Tim Olmsted said recently concerning the different personalities of his Tibetan teachers:

"What had a huge effect on me was to see that each of these great lamas manifested differently: Some were a bit wild, talking fast and walking fast. Others, like His Holiness Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche, were like rocks. Still others were warm and ver intimate, like Tulku Urgyen. Then there were boisterous characters like Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche. This diversity helped me relax and realize I didn't have to act in any one way to be a dharma practitioner. I didnt have to walk in a certain way or have a particular rap."

Ultimately this is what allowed me to break away from being exclusive to the Tibetan trip (but with great respect for it and good on anyone doing it): I had a great relationship with one teacher in particular, then we were separated, the next one I tried to work with I learned a great deal from, but we otherwise didn't "click." It was a blessing for me to finally not be dependent on anyone but myself, but also it was the right time for it to unfold like that. I am without words to convey my gratitude to all of the amazing teachings I have received...

Check out my Buddhist Geeks article on Dzogchen here:

http://www.buddhistgeeks.com/2010/05/maha-ati-natural-liberation-through-primordial-awareness/

They left out the bibliography, but the footnotes include several book references worth a look.

john e mumbles said...

LW: As far as Mahamudra teachings (you're in good hands with Garchen Rinpoche, imo btw), I worked (w/ guidance of a teacher) with the Six Yogas of Naropa, and with the text Mahamudra Teachings of the Supreme Siddhas, trans by Lama Sherab Dorje w/intro by Khenchen Trangu Rinpoche; as well as Dzogchen Ponlop's Wild Awakenings on the Heart of Mahamudra and Dzogchen and other available texts in English, but the very best instructional Mahamudra texts I've used are: Clear Light of Bliss, and Mahamudra Tantra (also w/the guidance of a teacher) both by Geshe Kelsang Gyatso. Highly rec.

A Pythonist said...

Blasphemy

Anonymous said...

OH MY GOD, tibetan buddhists like john e mumbles and jinzy have conquered this blog while brad is away! they are everywhere, evil, evil, evil!

Borg said...

Whaahahhaha~!
Brad has not only abandoned us, he is posting on Reblogging Brad Warner instead!
Traitor!!!!

Anonymous said...

Anonymous @8:41 AM Anonymous said...
who here practices awareness while they type each key?

you may have the key...

Anonymous said...

b
u
t
t
h
a
t
'
s
n
o
t
t
h
e
p
o
i
n
t
.

Sergeant said...

Happy New Year !
Harmony And Peace.
http://berlin-tour-1973.blogspot.com/